ErrinG42
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:44 pm

Master Settings Database - User Populated

Wed Oct 10, 2018 6:17 am

I have yet to find a concise, comprehensive table of S3D settings for all current parameters. I realize there are a zilions of printer models out there, people use different nozzle sizes and styes, etc.

But could S3D, or a contributor out there, not start a table or database where individual users like me could:
a) find a great starting point on settings when running a new material
b) contribute all pertinent info, including specific material grade, nozze size and type, etc. etc., when one of us has it really nailed down well?

Just a thought. It sure would beat the endless forum searching and googling to get a scattered bits and pieces of settings that work for different materials, printer configurations, and general type of builds.

Sure, the internet is full of top level general info...nylon needs to be super dry, heated bed in this or that range, etc. But I'm talking specifics....retraction and coast settings, extrusion multipliers, outline speed versus infill speed, specific fan speeds, etc.

Any 3D printing database guys out there??

SWCNT
Posts: 23
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2018 8:51 am

Re: Master Settings Database - User Populated

Wed Oct 10, 2018 9:05 pm

I get what you're saying, but I don't think it's going to pan out the way you think, at least not in the form of a database. I think the reason you don't see something like this--beyond the obvious time commitment for no financial gain--is that once you get the basic settings, everything else is very printer, material, and model specific. Say you buy a new Prusa or CR-10 or whatever. If it's a decent printer, the stock profile is usually OK--plenty of Youtubers show that--but to really get almost any printer from good to awesome, you need to tweak the profile. And to do that, you need to understand why and what you're doing. Rather than a database of tweaks and settings, I'd argue what new people really need is help developing the conceptual understanding of WHY they are changing things. That way you can assess the situation for yourself and make necessary changes to your machine rather than blindly adjusting stuff based on what some random guy on the internet said. Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.

User avatar
dkightley
Posts: 1695
Joined: Tue Mar 10, 2015 3:09 pm

Re: Master Settings Database - User Populated

Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:38 am

I couldn't agree more. Every printer in its environment is different to every other printer. Even one printer can print differently at differing times of the year....different temperature, different humidity, etc., etc.

As stated, the most important thing to remember is understanding what the settings do is more important than copying settings from somebody else. There is a thread here on the forum ( viewtopic.php?f=8&t=2367 ) that explains what each setting does. If you can get to grips with this, then setting up a new printer...or a new material...ends up a simple job!

And one tip for beginners....don't change more than one setting at a time until you understand what the change you have made does! If you change two settings and see a difference, how do you know which setting change actually made the difference?? Even worse, change two settings and you see no difference....possibly because the two changes may have counter-acted each other!

My second tip.....do not try and be too ambitious too quickly! Its hard not to get excited about what you could do.....better to take your time and do things at a pace you can understand. That way, you'll find 3D printing a more enjoyable hobby or work experience.
Doug Kightley
Volunteer at the National Tramway Museum http://www.tramway.co.uk
Railway modeller and webmaster at http://www.talkingtgauge.net

wirlybird
Posts: 846
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2016 12:32 pm

Re: Master Settings Database - User Populated

Thu Oct 11, 2018 5:38 am

dkightley wrote:
Thu Oct 11, 2018 4:38 am
I couldn't agree more. Every printer in its environment is different to every other printer. Even one printer can print differently at differing times of the year....different temperature, different humidity, etc., etc.

As stated, the most important thing to remember is understanding what the settings do is more important than copying settings from somebody else. There is a thread here on the forum ( viewtopic.php?f=8&t=2367 ) that explains what each setting does. If you can get to grips with this, then setting up a new printer...or a new material...ends up a simple job!

And one tip for beginners....don't change more than one setting at a time until you understand what the change you have made does! If you change two settings and see a difference, how do you know which setting change actually made the difference?? Even worse, change two settings and you see no difference....possibly because the two changes may have counter-acted each other!

My second tip.....do not try and be too ambitious too quickly! Its hard not to get excited about what you could do.....better to take your time and do things at a pace you can understand. That way, you'll find 3D printing a more enjoyable hobby or work experience.
Just to add a little to what DK has said.

Don't make settings changes just for the sake of changing something. First, it is important to try to understand the issue and what can cause it, do some research. Then to understand what change may be needed and the consequences of the changed setting - what result are you expecting from the change?
Make settings changes for a reason (stringing - extrude temp may be to hot) and then see if you get the expected result.

Most printing issues are simple fixes so don't over complicate it! If all fails go back to defaults and start over.

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